Saturday, March 26, 2022

Supporting Teachers in In-Person and Virtual Teaching: A Coaching Call, Ep. 95 Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast

Image of kids with iPads and the words "Supporting Teachers in In-Person and Virtual Teaching - Coaching Call"

This month on The Coaching Podcast we’ve been chatting about the challenges in education brought on by the pandemic. We’ve focused on supporting teachers in in-person and virtual teaching.

On this episode, I'm joined by Felicia, a first-year instructional coach. During our coaching call, we discuss how she can define her role and build trust with teachers. We talk about her goals and ways to get teachers excited about coaching.

The Role of an Instructional Coach

The role of an instructional coach has changed so much in the last two years. Coaching is very different now. It can be hard for teachers to identify coaching responsibilities, especially since coaches have been doing a lot of things that aren’t part of our job description.

Like many coaches, Felicia struggles with clearly defining her role and communicating it to her team. To get a sense of what she wants her role to be, I suggest imagining what an ideal coaching day looks like. Specifically, identifying how she wants to spend most of her time growing her teachers. 

Felicia says that she wants to understand the needs of her teachers better, especially during this time of transition in education. She also wants to work through coaching cycles and do PLC work. 

I recommend that she have a conversation with her administration, so there’s a clear understanding of her role and how she approaches coaching work. She can then send a survey to teachers or have an informal chat to learn what they would like help with. Once she knows what the teachers want to focus on, she can start coaching with purpose.

Supporting Teachers in In-Person and Virtual Teaching

During the coaching call, we talk about different ways that Felicia can support her teachers. Below are some ideas we discussed on the show. If you want to hear all the details, click on the media player below to listen to the entire episode.

Coaching Menu

A coaching menu is a collection of the supports that you're prepared to offer teachers. You can create a simple one-page document describing the different supports and share it with teachers. It doesn’t need to be fancy. The simpler the better so teachers don’t feel overwhelmed.

Showcase Work with Other Teachers

Try to find a teacher you’ve worked with that is willing to share their coaching experiences. You can use them as a little commercial. Take 10-15 minutes during a PD to have them share out or show photos from your work together as a slideshow. It will showcase the good work you’ve done and get other teachers interested in your coaching services.

Coffee with a Coach

Another suggestion I had for Felicia is doing coffee or cupcakes with a coach. You invite teachers to come and get treats. While they're there, you tell them about what you do and ask them questions to find out what support they need.

Listen for Coaching Opportunities

It can be really helpful to listen for opportunities to coach. Now I know it doesn't sound like much, but you'll find little opportunities by listening for complaints, problems, or challenges. You can then offer to work with the teacher to come up with solutions. It’s a very effective way to initiate a coaching cycle organically.

Observing Other Teachers

Our coaching work doesn't always have to be us, as the partner for the learning. You can arrange for teachers to observe each other. 

One important thing to remember is that the lessons teachers see don’t have to be perfect. There’s value in watching lessons that didn’t go as planned.

I suggest Felicia try having her teachers observe each other. They can even do it virtually because they’re already teaching using a hybrid model. Then you don't need to find any coverage. They can watch it when it's convenient. 

Final Thoughts on Supporting Teachers in In-Person and Virtual Teaching

Coaching is necessary for everyone not just teachers who are struggling. We can all build our skills and hone our craft.

During the call, Felicia and I discuss common coaching issues that both new and seasoned coaches face on the job. I give you lots of ideas to help figure out what to focus on and how you can build trust so that your coaching is beneficial for everyone.

Ready to listen? You can listen below with the media player, or search for Buzzing with MS. B: The Coaching Podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts!

This post contains links to products from one or more of our advertisers. This means I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post when you click on links to those products.

Learn more



Image of Chrissy Beltran for the Confident Literacy Coach Course

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas?

Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb.

If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
Pin It

Saturday, March 19, 2022

5 Tech Tools for Coaching In-Person and Virtually, Ep. 94 Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast

Woman sitting at a desk with a laptop with the words" 5 Tech Tools for Coaching In-Person and Virtually"

The theme this month on The Coaching Podcast is virtually in-person. We've been talking about how to use the technology that came from virtual learning to impact in-person learning.

I don’t believe that virtual learning is the best mode of learning for our kids or teachers all the time. Going remote was done out of necessity. But there were some positive things that educators learned as a result, and we don’t want to lose that.

During this episode, I share five tech tools for coaching in-person and virtually. These are the online tools I fell in love with during remote teaching. In this blog, I’ll give you a few ideas from the show for how instructional coaches can use them with teachers. If you want to hear all my tips and tricks listen to the episode using the media player below.

Tech Tools for Coaching In-Person and Virtually

Here are my five favorite tech tools and some ways to use them when coaching. I also have a nifty little handout that includes these five tools and specific ideas for how to use them. You can get it by entering your email down below.

1. Google Forms 

My first recommendation is something that most people already know about, but I think it's so valuable. There are lots of reasons I love Google Forms, including how easy they are to create and customize. They’re convenient to use and the results are attached to a Google sheet, so you can easily see responses.

One way I use Google Forms is to survey teachers You can ask them what type of PD support they want and plan around those themes. After a PD, send teachers a post professional development survey. The results will show you how they felt about the PD, what they learned, and how they're going to integrate the learning in their classroom.

2. Mentimeter

Mentimeter is a fun interactive tool that can be used to get responses from teachers. There are different things you can do with it like create graphs and word clouds using teacher answers.

With the scale feature, you choose statements and teachers decide whether they agree, disagree, or fall somewhere in the middle. If you do an activation guide, teachers can select how they feel about different statements before and after the PD to identify the impacts of the learning.

3. Flipgrid

Flipgrid is a cool way for people to create videos and respond to each other. It's useful for team building and a ton of other purposes.

The reason that I love Flipgrid is that you can create a stimulus video and have people respond to it. Teachers can interact with each other which creates an authentic dialogue.

One of my favorite ways to use Flipgrid is for book studies. Teachers are busy and don’t always have time to get together to talk. They can use Flipgrid to share their reflections and have a dialogue about the book.

4. Calendly

Calendly is an online calendar tool. You set your available hours and have teachers sign up for a time that works for them. It’s an easy way to give people access to the times you have available, so you don't have to email back and forth. The paid version even sends automated emails to remind people of the meetings.

I like to use Calendly for documentation. If you need to show the support you've provided to teachers, you can show your calendar. You can also use the calendar to explain where your time is going each day. It can help you advocate for your time when you get asked to take on a new task or do something outside of your normal scope of work.

5. Voxer

I was introduced to Voxer by my Coffee and Coaching partner, Nicole S. Turner. It's an app that you can download on your phone and use to communicate with groups of people. 

One of the biggest problems with text messages and emails is that it can be hard to determine the tone of written words. Things can be interpreted differently depending on who's reading the message and their mindset at that moment. The best way to make sure people understand your tone is to say it, instead of writing it. 

Voxer allows you to send voice memos and shows you when each person has listened to them. It's great for PLCs or teams of teachers working on a project. 

Final Thoughts on Tech Tools for Coaching In-Person and Virtually

There you have it! Five of my favorite tech tools for coaching in-person and virtually. Listen to the entire episode to hear all my suggestions and learn about the bonus tool I mention on the show. 

Don’t forget to sign up below for my free handout that lists all five tools and practical ideas for how to use them when coaching teachers.

Ready to listen? You can listen below with the media player, or search for Buzzing with MS. B: The Coaching Podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts!

This post contains links to products from one or more of our advertisers. This means I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post when you click on links to those products.

Learn more



Coffee and coaching membership banner with pictures of Chrissy Beltran and Nicole S. Turner


Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas?

Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb.

If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
Pin It

Saturday, March 12, 2022

Flipped Learning with The Teaching Touch, Ep. 93 Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast

Image of Chrissy Beltran smiling with words "Flipped Learning with The Teaching Touch"

During the early to mid-pandemic, there was a big push to try flipped learning. On this episode of The Coaching Podcast, Belu Tur and Gi Zoccola from The Teaching Touch join me to talk about what flipped classrooms look like in action. They explain the benefits of flipping a classroom and the tools they use most often. We chat about how coaches can help teachers implement this blended learning model to open up class time and differentiate learning.

Benefits of Flipped Learning

In the flipped classroom most of the group lectures are recorded and the students watch them before coming to class. This reduces the amount of teacher talk and provides students with the opportunity to watch the videos as many times as needed to understand the lesson. School time can then be devoted to pair work, group work, and individualized instruction. Belu and Gi explain that this is just one of many benefits of flipping a classroom.

Flipped learning also encourages families to get involved in their children’s learning. Parents can watch the video lesson and have a resource to help their kids if they need it.

They say another great thing about the flipped classroom is that teachers have more time to work with students in smaller groups. Teachers acts as facilitators and students participate in self-paced, differentiated activities. This allows students to get more involved in their own learning process.

Another benefit of flipping a classroom is that you can start little by little. You can begin with one activity or subject area. You don’t have to change your whole day all at once.

Videos and the Flipped Classroom

Videos are an important part of flipped learning. Belu and Gi recommend using teacher-made videos that have a clear instructional aim. Teachers can use videos found online, but it’s more meaningful and engaging for students to see someone they already know.

They say it's important to teach students what they're supposed to do before, during, and after videos. Teachers need to explain whether they’re allowed to watch it more than once, if students can pause it, when they should take notes, etc. 

The length of the video will depend on the age of the children. Videos for young students should be brief. They say a video for first-grade students shouldn't be longer than a minute or a minute and a half.

Misconceptions and Challenges of Flipped Learning

Belu and Gi share some common misunderstandings and challenges with flipped learning. They say it’s a big misconception to think that a flipped classroom means just sending videos to students. It’s much more than that. How you use the videos and the tasks you assign with them are what counts. Flipping a classroom is about making the most of the limited time teachers and students have together.

One of the biggest challenges that we faced at the beginning of the pandemic was the lack of technology and access to the internet. While there has been a lot of progress, this could still be an issue in some places. For flipped learning to be most effective, teachers need to ensure students have access to the content before class.

They say another challenge is getting teachers to do something new and unfamiliar. It can be overwhelming for educators to make a big change or envision what this hybrid model could look like in the classroom. 

Instructional Coaching and Flipped Learning

When teachers try something new, they need support. During the episode, we talk about how coaches can guide teachers through the process and make it easier. Instructional coaches can encourage teachers to try flipped learning a little at a time, so they don’t feel overwhelmed.

Belu and Gi say that the best part of flipping a classroom is that there is no one way to do it. Having a supportive coach allows teachers to reflect on the journey and figure things out along the way.

The Flipped Classroom

I hope you enjoy the episode as much as I did. If I were to go back into the classroom, I would try to integrate some elements of this into my own teaching. I’d probably choose one subject area and have kids learn the content initially at home. Then they could come to school and do cool stuff with it because we would have even more learning time. I think it would be such a fun way to teach without doing as much direct teaching.

Flipped Learning Tools

Want to test out flipped learning in your school?

There are resources in my TpT store that would work well if you want to give it a try. I have two collections of writing mini-lessons geared toward having students watch a video and then do an activity. One way to use them would be to have students do the interactive mini-lesson at home and work on writing pieces together at school. You can learn more about these products by clicking the links below.

Sensory Details Writing Minilessons for Google Classroom - Distance Learning

Narrative Beginnings Minilessons for Google Classroom - Distance Learning 

During the episode, Belu and Gi share their favorite online tools. These can be used for virtual or in-person learning. If you want to know how they suggest using each one be sure to check out the entire episode.

Edpuzzle

Canva

Loom

Screencastify

Padlet

Jam Board

Flipgrid

Ready to listen? You can listen below with the media player, or search for Buzzing with MS. B: The Coaching Podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts!

This post contains links to products from one or more of our advertisers. This means I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post when you click on links to those products.

Learn more




Image of Chrissy Beltran smiling with the words The Confident Literacy Coach


Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas?

Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb.

If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
Pin It

Saturday, March 5, 2022

Lessons Learned from Virtual Teaching with Michael Singletary, Ep. 92 Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast

Image of children using tablet with the words Lessons Learned from Virtual Teaching with Michael Singletary

Lots of great learning happened while schools were remote. Teachers learned new strategies. Coaches figured out creative solutions. 

We don't want to forget the innovative teaching that happened because of technology. Instead, we need to take all the good stuff learned while virtual and apply it purposefully to the classroom. 

Michael Singletary from Principal Teacher Co. joins me on The Coaching Podcast to talk about the lessons learned from virtual teaching. We discuss what coaches can do to help teachers apply what they learned from remote teaching to the classroom. She shares her favorite online tools and different ways to use them for in-person learning.  

Lessons Learned from Virtual Teaching

Virtual learning changed the way we deliver instruction. We saw teachers become more comfortable with technology and use it in novel ways. 

I asked Michael to share some of the lessons learned from virtual teaching. She says that one of the biggest lessons was to start small and keep it simple. Her recommendation is to leverage the technology that teachers are already using and not to add too many new things at once. If you're going to introduce something new, do it slowly and purposefully.

She says another thing this experience taught her was that most teachers were not comfortable teaching on video. It was just something they had to do. Now Michael sees her teachers using video more often, especially during small group work. They teach a small group while another independent group watches a lesson that was recorded earlier. 

During our chat, Michael explains why video is an excellent way for teachers to see themselves in action and reflect on their teaching skills. She says we can also record teachers and share the videos as examples of model classrooms for coaching sessions. This reduces the need for coverage which is hard to come by these days. 

Another positive thing that new technology has done is to make teachers more comfortable asking for tech assistance. Michael says that “it has made the entry point for coaching a lot easier”. If you start with something small like that, it can lead to other things. 

Schools had some computers and iPads before the pandemic, but they didn't spend a lot of money on technology. This changed when schools invested in laptops for all students. Now teachers and students have access to more technology in schools than ever before.

The way technology is being used in classrooms has also changed a lot. Michael explains that in the past many online programs functioned as diagnostic tools. Now educators are more focused on product creation, rather than just generating a plan that requires students to spend a certain amount of time using a program.

I asked Michael if there was anything she was happy to leave behind from remote learning. She explained that technology can make teachers, students, and parents feel isolated. This is why she's happy to leave 100% virtual for a hybrid approach. That way the people who need face-to-face contact have the option of getting it. 

Technology for Virtual and In-Person Teaching

Many tools used while teaching remotely can be used for in-person learning. During the episode, Michael and I discuss some of our favorite online teaching tools and what they can do. 

Here’s a list of the tools we talked about that can be used when transitioning from virtual to in-person learning. Listen to the entire episode to get ideas for how to use them on your campus.

1. Google Workspace (Formerly Google Suite) 

2. Google Classroom 

3. Google Forms 

4. Jamboard 

5. Reading A-Z 

6. Raz Plus 

7. Pear Deck  

8. Canva 

9. Adobe Spark 

10. Blooket

Coaching and Virtual Teaching

There are different ways instructional coaches can support teachers while they transition from virtual to in-person learning. Michael's number one recommendation for coaches is to get inside the classrooms and model for them. Often questions come up as teachers watch you and this encourages discussions. 

She says teachers learn more from coaches who are willing to show instead of tell. If a teacher is struggling with a subject or tool, go in and help them. Apply a gradual release to allow the teacher to feel comfortable and learn from you.

This episode has lots of ideas for what coaches can do to support teachers right now as they get reacquainted with in-person learning. If you're ready for more on this topic, listen to the whole episode and check out the resources below. 

Ready to listen? You can listen below with the media player, or search for Buzzing with MS. B: The Coaching Podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts!

This post contains links to products from one or more of our advertisers. This means I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post when you click on links to those products.

Learn more
Email: principalteacherco@gmail.com




Image of Chrissy Beltran smiling with the words The Confident Literacy Coach


Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas?

Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb.

If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
Pin It
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...