Saturday, February 29, 2020

Planning Collaboratively: Before, During & After PLC; Buzzing with Ms. B: Ep. 7

Facilitating a collaborative planning session can be overwhelming if you don't have a system or routine in place. This Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast provides steps to follow before, during, and after a planning PLC to make sure instructional coaches are preparing their teachers for success in planning together! Learn about howwe built a common language and strategies together, and get a free download for building content knowledge at the beginning of a planning PLC.
My first collaborative planning PLC was an absolute nightmare.
 
I walked into a room full of teachers and I was ready to rock-and-roll! I had ideas. I had a lesson plan format. I had mapped out exactly how this is going to go based on what you know the district expects. Sounds great right? I was prepared! (I even had snacks.)
 
This might not come as a surprise to you, but that is not how it went down. When you are walking into a collaboration session with teachers and you’re not speaking the same language, even the best-laid plans fall apart.
 
I know from personal experience. This is exactly what happened to me my second week at a new school. I began dreading PLC days and I had to force myself to go to work on Tuesdays...at first. You can hear how I turned it around by listening to Episode 7 of Buzzing with Ms. B.
 
If any of this sounds familiar, I'm sorry. Facilitating a PLC gone wrong is so uncomfortable and stressful! But never fear - because I have some great tips to help you collaborate with teachers that are super effective. This is a simple before, during, and after method that will make your PLCs productive and purposeful. (And you'll stop dreading them, too.)

Before the planning session
Let’s start with what you need to do before this meeting. First and foremost, make sure everyone is prepared! If teachers are walking in and saying, “Oh right! We’re talking about fiction today!” that is  not a good sign!
 
You also need to be prepared. Have a some extra ideas and resources just in case they're needed. You never know when a teacher is going to ask you about something new they can try. There are many ways you can make sure you and your teachers are prepared when they walk in, so make sure you listen to the full episode to find out how.

During the session
Now that you know where you're headed, what’s next? During the meeting you want to make sure everyone is on the same page and shared their content knowledge. You can do this by talking about the “Top Five” things teachers need to know about the content they’re going to be teaching. Learn more about the “Top Five” approach as well as how your planning session should look by listening to Buzzing with Ms. B Episode 7.

After the session
Finally, make sure everyone gets the notes. Whether you set up a rotation or have a designated note-taker, make sure someone (not you) is sending out what you talked about with enough time for people to prepare for their own classroom lessons.
 
Collaborating with teachers can be scary (especially if they aren’t friendlies), but coming in prepared, having a solid meeting structure, and some great follow up can make it one of the best tools in your coaching arsenal. Tune into Buzzing with Ms. B Episode 7 to get the full scoop. Happy Coaching!
 
Ready for the how-to? Listen here, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 



It's free download time! I'm so excited to offer you my Content Building One-Pager for fiction! Use this handy guide to get everybody on the same page and build a common language with accurate instructional information for teachers (and avoid misinformation like, "Fiction is fake!")


Ready to learn more?
Planning with Teachers
Balanced Literacy Sorts: build a common language
The Instructional Coaching Binder MegaPack: get organized!

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
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Saturday, February 22, 2020

High-Impact Coaching: Teaching with a Partner; The Coaching Podcast, Ep. 6

Coteaching can be stressful, but the benefits far outweigh the drawbacks once you have a plan! It's one of the most impactful ways to support teacher growth. This episode breaks down co-teaching into easy steps and gives you tips that will help you create a great collaborative learning experience for you and your cooperating teacher. Learn about how to plan together effectively to ensure that everybody knows what to do. Do you miss teaching? I miss teaching every single day. Co-teaching is such a unique and fun part of the coaching cycle because you get to be in the classroom.
 
It can be a bit scary though because those aren’t your kids, and this isn’t your classroom. But I am here to tell you that it is worth it and there is a simple way to make it work for you and the teacher!

Here’s what you need to do before, during, and after you co-teach.


Before Co-Teaching
I can not say this enough: plan, plan, plan. Planning is such a huge part of co-teaching because everyone has to be on the same page in every way. You need to plan your lesson, who’s doing what, what the behavior expectations are, who’s making what, who’s bringing what, the list goes on and on.
  
If you’re not on the same page in every way, your cotaught lesson is going to be miserable! (Trust me - I'm speaking from experience!) Listen to the full episode to find out what happens when two teachers don’t get together to plan, and how to make sure you aren’t falling into the same trap.
  
During Co-teaching
During the process of co-teaching you want to make sure you always follow the plan you worked so hard to create. If you veer from the plan, your teacher might not know what to do, and your goal is to work together! You also want to exercise the tried and true think-aloud. If you can slow your thinking down for the teacher, then they can actually internalize those thought processes and start applying some of that decision making to their own teaching because that’s the nitty gritty of teaching.
  
After Co-teaching
After everything is said and done, you have to do the second most important step: debrief. If you don’t debrief, everything you just did was pointless because you’re not giving the teacher anything to walk away with. When you sit down with your teacher, you want to talk about how co-teaching felt and what went great and what was only ok. You also want to review student work together!
 
Need more tips for providing feedback to teachers? I sat down with Nicole Turner in Episode 4 of Buzzing with Ms. B and she gave us some great insight as to how to give a teacher meaningful feedback without damaging the relationship you have with him/her.

Co-teaching is such an amazing way to get back into the classroom and to provide great coaching to your teachers. You can find out more about what you need to do before, during, and after your co-teaching lesson by tuning into Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast Episode 6, and tune in next week to find how to plan collaboratively with teachers. Happy coaching!

Listen here to Episode 6, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 

 
Ready to co-teach? Check out the free download: the Preparing to Co-teach Checklist. It'll help you be ready for your next co-taught lesson!



Want to learn more about Co-teaching in Classrooms?
Prepare and Plan for Co-teaching with these forms
Preparing to Model and Co-teach

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!
   
Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative

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Saturday, February 15, 2020

Five Tips for Your Modeling Career, Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast, Ep. 5

Modeling a lesson in a classroom you're unfamiliar with can be a real challenge for instructional coaches. You have to plan, prepare, and deliver a lesson to a group of kids who don't know you! This episode of Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast includes five tips for effective modeling. Be ready for the best possible lesson with the free modeling checklist download! Does modeling in classrooms stress you out? It used to stress me out, big time. It's scary - you don't know the kids, you are walking in to model just one piece of the learning, and the classroom isn't set up to your own teaching style.

We all have horror stories. You can check out my modeling horror story in Episode 3 of Buzzing with Ms. B...if you dare!
 
Modeling can be scary, but it's also is one of the best tools you can have as an instructional coach, especially if you have teachers who learn best by watching (which, let's be honest, is most people - we need to see things in action!). While modeling can be very effective, it has to be done right!

Here's how.

My top five tips for modeling are the following: establish a plan, exercise chunking, bring your own materials, set behavior expectations, and think-aloud while teaching.

No matter what you always want to establish a plan of attack that your teacher knows about. Sometimes we assume that we are speaking the same language. We think we have the same philosophy and vocabularies, but when it comes to planning together, it's important to plan specifically and make sure each person knows what the lesson will look like beforehand. You can find out how I turned a grade level of unsure and resistant teachers on to guided reading by hosting a small group modeling session in Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast Episode 5 (below)!

Once you've established a purposeful plan with your cooperating teacher, there are a few things you'll want to do to be prepared for the lesson. The most essential two are: bring your own stuff and set expectations.

Teachers have a lot going on. An email full of directions and requests to prepare for your modeled lesson is likely to get stuck at the bottom of the to-do pile. So, if you know the students are going to need certain colors readily available, you should just bring them with you. If you don’t, you’re going to start having behavior issues and kids who are unprepared for the work you're asking them to do - especially if kids have to all herd to one area of the room to get the supplies.
  
Having a simple classroom management approach is so important because those aren’t your kids. When you’re going into a classroom to model something, if there’s no plan in place, choose something simple, keep it focused, make sure kids know what the expectation is., and if teachers want to use it when you’re gone, good for them! You’ve given them another tool. I choose three basic behavior expectations and I word them carefully; find out how in episode 5!

Finally, always use the age old teaching method: think a loud! This is something we do for students, so why wouldn’t we use it for teachers too? It’s a simple thing to do and all you need to do is fill in the blanks. Learn all about how and why we think aloud in the episode!

There is so much more to modeling than this. You can get all the details by tuning into Buzzing with Ms. B Episode 5 to hear more about great modeling strategies. Happy coaching!
 
Listen here to Episode 5, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 

 
Ready to get started? Get the free modeling checklist! It'll help you make sure you're totally prepared to model in classrooms so you can have the best experience possible (and your teacher can, too.) It's one page from the Instructional Coach's Book of Plans & Lists!
 
 
Want more tools for modeling in classrooms?
Preparing to Model & Co-teach
My Top Five Ways Instructional Coaches Can Grow Teachers
Coaching in Classrooms: Editable Forms & Presentation
Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves by Diane Sweeney *affiliate link

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
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Saturday, February 8, 2020

Providing feedback to teachers that's constructive and kind; Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast, Ep. 4

Does envisioning a debriefing conversation cause you to break out in hives? Providing feedback to teachers can be stressful, but it's an important part of instructional coaching. Nicole S. Miller of Simply Coaching + Teaching joins me today to talk about some tips and methods for having a reflective and constructive conversation with teachers. Listen in to learn how to talk to teachers...without ticking them off! Providing feedback is one of the hardest parts of being an instructional coach, or at least a close second to the amount of tasks we have to juggle. There are several facets you have to think about when giving feedback, because you are critiquing someone’s work - it's very personal and it can be hard to hear even the most well-intentioned feedback.. 

Nicole S. Turner, the creator behind Simply Coaching + Teaching, is here to talk to us about how to give effective feedback to teachers. Nicole has been in the education field for the last 15 years and has been coaching for six. Throughout her coaching career, Nicole has worked in the elementary and high school setting where she has experienced a wide variety of roles from being almost full time in the classroom to running a variety of departments. You can learn more about Nicole and her coaching resources by visiting Simply Coaching + Teaching

When you give feedback, you need to ensure you are doing two things: focusing on the evidence and being specific.
 
Here's why: It’s important to focus on the evidence you see happening in the classroom because evidence cannot be refuted. If you've had some difficulty with getting you and your teachers on the same page, try video coaching! Video coaching allows you to have evidence at your fingertips and you and the teacher are both seeing the exact same thing. You can learn more about Video Coaching, and its incredible benefits by listening to the Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast, Episode 4!
 
The second aspect, giving specific feedback, is also important. When you give feedback, you want to make sure it is focused on the goal your teacher is working towards. If you veer off to something else, the teacher may become overwhelmed or feel as though you are picking on him/her which can be damaging to the relationship. Feedback should never be damaging or demeaning. Feedback is about giving specifics that can be implemented right way.
 
One great place to start is by focusing on the positive! In Buzzing with Ms. B Episode 4, Nicole talks about giving out positive notes once a month. It’s a simple note that just states something you liked as you did a quick walkthrough. However, a little note is not enough feedback. You will still need to have feedback meetings with teachers. When you have your feedback meetings, it's important to be positive but you also want to be honest and helpful. If you are giving good feedback, there will always be a next step for the teacher to try out.
 
I know what you're thinking. "That sounds great, but my teachers aren't receptive to my feedback." I get it. We've all been there! Sometimes you can do all the right things and still have a teacher who is resistant to your suggestions. When this happens, you should always hear what he/she has to say but keep it focused. Allow the teacher to vent, then circle the conversation back to the evidence based feedback you need to discuss. If a teacher is having an issue with a specific student or a group of students, you can always discuss ways to be proactive rather than reactive. Sometimes the conversation they have with you is exactly what they need to see their classroom dynamic differently.
  
Finally, when giving feedback make sure you check yourself to make sure you have the right mindset. Tune into Buzzing with Ms. B Episode 4 to hear Nicole’s biggest piece of coaching advice and remember to check out the links for some great resources! There's so much more in the episode that we couldn't pack into this sneak peek, so make sure you listen to the whole thing!
Listen here to Episode 4, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 



Did you enjoy listening to Nicole and me chat about coaching? Check out our monthly webinars: Coffee & Coaching!
 
Get a free download to help you have constructive and reflective debriefing conversations with teachers. The collection of sentence starters will help you frame the conversation and keep it focused and purposeful!
 
Want more tools for giving feedback?
Coaching Resistant Teachers Challenge: 5 Days (plus 1) to change!
Six tips for providing constructive feedback to teachers
Printable notes from the coach

Resources from Nicole S. Turner
Simply Coaching + Teaching
Simply Instructional Coaching: the book on Amazon
Video Self-Reflection Form 

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
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Saturday, February 1, 2020

The Coaching Cycle in Six Easy Steps, The Coaching Podcast Ep. 3

Instructional coaches, are you afraid to start a coaching cycle because you're not sure how to make it work? Then look no further: this episode shared six easy steps to implementing coaching cycles with your teachers! These steps are simple and purposeful, and it'll guide you through the process of a coaching cycle so you'll be ready to use this powerful strategy to make an impact on teaching and learning! Check out the post and the free download, too! As an instructional coach, you have to have some tools in your toolbox to make an impact on your teachers. No, I’m not talking about coffee (although that definitely helps); I’m talking about strategies! One of the best strategies you have as an instructional is the coaching cycle.

The coaching cycle is a simple structure that gives you a lot of freedom to support teachers in different ways. This practical method has three parts: the pre-conference, the observation/ modeled lesson/ or co-teaching lesson, and a debrief.

To start your six-step process, find a “friendly”! This is seriously the best advice I can offer you, especially if you haven't conducted a coaching cycle before (or if you have and it left you feeling crummy). 
 
A friendly is someone who wants to work with you. This is especially important if you are new to coaching or to a campus. So, think about your staff. Is there someone who has some great stuff going on but wants to try something new? Invite your friendly to work with you.  You can send an invite via email or you can give them a physical invite which can be found in my free download below!

Once your friendly teacher accepts your invite, you need set a pre-conference. During the pre-conference with the teacher, you’ll start making a plan. You have to plan for literally everything.
 
I am not exaggerating. If you have not planned for management, management will be tricky for you. If you have not planned for resources,  you could potentially walk into that classroom and find an age inappropriate text (speaking from experience). If you have not planned for when you’re going to debrief, you’re probably not going to debrief!

I cannot stress this enough: plan for everything! If you don’t believe me, check out the horror horror story in Episode 3!

After you’ve planned your pre-conference, what services you’re going to provide for the teacher, what the goals are, and the overall lesson plan, it’s time to act! During this time period you need to do whatever you and the teacher decided on whether that’s an observation, modeled lesson, or co-teaching lesson. Finally, you have to debrief.

The coaching cycle without a debrief is like a pen without ink. There’s no point. The debrief session is where you make the learning stick! During the debrief, you should have a conversation about how the lesson went overall, discuss how the students responded to the lesson, and make a plan for next time! You can learn more about giving good feedback in Episode 4 when we talk to Nicole Turner the author of Simply Coaching.

The coaching cycle is one of the best resources that you can use! Learn more about the 6 steps and how to win free resources with a simple hashtag by tuning into Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast, Episode #3.
  
Listen here to Episode 3, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 



Get started with the coaching cycle with this download. It's some of the best tools I've created for supporting teachers in their classrooms and making a difference, and it includes the resources I mentioned in the podcast episode: the invitations, planning document, and more! Don't be afraid to start. Grab the free download right now!
 


Want to learn more about the Coaching Cycle?
What to say...and what not to say during the coaching cycle
Conducting a Coaching Cycle
Coaching in Classrooms: The Resource

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review on iTunes! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
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My Top Five Ways Instructional Coaches Can Grow Teachers: The Coaching Podcast, Ep. 2

Learn how to actually impact classrooms with these five different methods! In this episode, I dig into the coaching cycle, modeling, coteaching, collaborative planning, and digging into data - and I share tips for making each one work for you and your teachers! Instructional coaches and literacy coaches have a tough job, but with these five differentiated strategies, you're sure to reach even the most resistant teacher. How many hats do you wear? Instructional coaches take on so many different roles it can make your head spin! From administrative tasks, data collecting, hosting school events to meetings, meetings, and did I mention meetings?
 
Oh, and one more thing. You also have to coach! So how do we make sure we are doing our best for the teachers are supposed to be coaching? By supporting or teachers using one or a combination of these top five support methods. 

Why are there five different ways to support teachers? Well it’s simple.
Just like we differentiate for students, we need to differentiate for teachers. Different ways work for different teachers because different teachers have different needs.

Here are the top five ways to support your teachers in order of impact! 

#1 The Coaching Cycle

The coaching cycle is a three-part system that includes: a preconference, an observation/modeled lesson/co-taught lesson, and finally a debrief. Each of these is an important step in the coaching cycle. In the first step, you focus on setting a goal with the teacher. Letting the teacher set the goal is so important because it helps the teacher show ownership.
 
Next, you want to either observe, create a modeled lesson, or co-teach a lesson. This will be up to the teacher because each teacher will need something different. Not everyone is comfortable with being observed, and not everyone is comfortable with teaching together right away, so get to know and listen to your teachers and differentiate accordingly. Finally, you get to debrief! This can be nerve-wracking, so focus on staying positive but constructive.

#2 Modeling
Modeling can be done in conjunction with your coaching cycle or separately. This is an effective way to help your teachers because you are showing them what to do. While it can be helpful to teacher, it is a bit stressful for you because you will be working with students who you may not have a lot of experience with. When you model, you want to be specific and to the point. Modeling too much might make the teacher feel like they aren’t doing anything right.

#3 Co-Teaching
Again, this can be done in conjunction with the teaching cycle. Co-teaching is a great way to work with your teacher if they like to teach alongside you. When you use this support method, you need to make sure you have clearly defined roles going into the lesson. 

#4 Planning Support
This can be effective as long as teachers walk the walk after talking the talk. When you use this support system, you want to stay focused on your standards and high impact strategies. The biggest thing you must do when you’re planning together is write everything down! The main goal here is to make sure your teachers walk away with a plan they are prepared to execute.

#5 Digging in to Data
Again, data digs don’t always show up in the classroom. When you do a data dig, you want to make sure everyone has a copy (color coded if possible). If you have trouble getting participation from teachers, you could try talking chips! They’re easy to use.Here's how: give teachers a certain number of mini erasers or manipulatives and have them toss their chip in the middle when they contribute. This will prevent some “I just want out of here” attitudes from leaving the meeting without sharing their thinking.
 
Remember, just like in planning collaboratively, the goal is always to walk away with next steps. In this case, you want your teachers to walk away with an action plan  - otherwise it is a waste of time.

While you are wearing several hats, remember this: Magic doesn’t happen in the office. Magic doesn’t happen in the hallway. Magic doesn’t happen in the data room. Magic doesn’t happen in PLC. Magic happens in the classroom. Using these supports will help your teachers grow, right where they are.
 
Ready for the details? Listen here, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 



Coaching in teachers' classrooms is the most impactful way to grow teaching and learning on your campus. Get started today with these free resources! You'll get tips for coaching, the coaching menu, debriefing sentence starters, and more tools to help you work with teachers effectively!

 

Ready to learn more?
Preparing to Model & Coteach  
Creating a Coaching Support Plan
The Start-Up Guide to Instructional Coaching: an ebook for coaches 

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
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Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast Ep. 1: Show Notes

Every teacher deserves a coach...and every instructional coach does, too! Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast is just for you, coaches. Weekly episodes of real talk about my best tips, how-tos, and strategies for making an impact on teaching and learning at your school (even with those resistant teachers)! As a literacy coach and instructional coach, share ideas that are practical and easy to implement, perfect for the busy instructional coach who's trying to figure out their role, get organized, manage relationships and so many responsibilities, and communicate with teachers and administration at the same time. Check it out and change your coaching trajectory!A while back, I sent out a survey to two thousand instructional coaches. I wanted to know how they felt about their jobs.

And do you know what they said? Three words kept popping up, over and over:
 
Overwhelmed.
Frustrated.
Lonely.

That’s awful! Nobody wants to feel that way at work! But I totally get why it happens.

We’re frustrated when teachers don’t want our support, even after we try all of the tips from the coaching books we’ve read.

We’re overwhelmed by 8,000 responsibilities that have nothing to do with the actual work of coaching.

And we’re lonely because we’re not teachers and we’re not administrators.

We’re in the middle, which is sort of the worst place to be.

They say every teacher deserves a coach. But I’m here to tell you that every coach deserves one, too! You deserve the support you need to do your job.

So that’s what I’m doing.

Every week starting February 1, 2020, I’m going to share practical ideas and honest talk about instructional coaching. I’m going to speak from experience and get to the nitty gritty of what to do and what to say. We’re going to talk to guests who have made things work for them and for their teachers.

It’s going to help you feel confident in your coaching work, give you the tools you need to manage your millions of responsibilities, and help you connect with other coaches, even if you’re the only coach on your campus.

Because you can read all of the coaching books and follow all of the coaching advice, but if they’re not talking about the real work coaches have to do at real schools, it’s going to leave you feeling even more stressed out than before.

I can’t wait to help you change the trajectory of your instructional coaching! Tune in to the first episode of Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast today and become part of the Buzzing about Coaching community!

This first episode is a short one. It talks all about my path to coaching...and why I cried nonstop for one entire summer. I am ready to share with you all about how I became a coach (when I wasn't even planning on leaving the classroom yet), and how it changed my teaching career.

Dying to know the details? Listen here, or subscribe anywhere you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify! Direct Link for Apple: https://apple.co/31bUNdN 



 

Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. Want more coaching ideas? Check me out at buzzingwithmsb.com and on Instagram @buzzingwithmsb. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, or leave me a review! It’s free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching!

Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative
 
  
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