Saturday, July 27, 2019

Planning collaboratively with teachers: the instructional coaching series

One type of professional learning community is a planning PLC. During a planning PLC, teachers plan collaboratively for an upcoming lesson, unit, or time frame. This post includes steps for instructional coaches to take to facilitate planning before, during, and after the planning session! Learn tips and ideas about why agendas matter, how to get started right away with preplanning, and why you start with the standards. Stop spinning your wheels during planning time and get something accomplished! It was my first full week on the job as an instructional coach.

My space was ready for my first
collaborative planning PLC. I'd made sweet little welcome gifts for the teachers I was working with. I had snacks on the tables. I'd set up a sample classroom library full of the books I had used in my own minilessons.

I was ready.

The first grade level arrived. I shared a general notetaking format with them that I'd created for our work together. It included space for us to write the focus for our unit, the TEKS (state standards) we'd be working with, and a spot for brainstorming possible experiences we wanted students to have.

I kept it broad and general, because I was afraid that too much structure would seem limiting and stifling to teachers.

"What does this mean?" one teacher asked, pointing to the "Learning Experiences" column. "That's where we can record the kinds of things we want students to do," I said. "Maybe it's a specific read aloud title, or a foldable, or a hands-on activity you'd like to share."

"And what's this?" another teacher asked, pointing to "Word Study". "Is that spelling?"

"Well, in our district," I said, confused at her confusion, "word study is a component of our reading framework, so it involves working with the standards that are about developing vocabulary strategies, context clues, and word parts like prefixes..." I trailed off. I realized that we were not speaking the same language.

Another teacher said, "I don't even know what I'm supposed to do on Monday." "Well," I said, "We're here to figure that out together. Let's take a look at -"

"Can you show me how to access the online curriculum system?" another teacher asked. "I can never log in."

The meeting quickly devolved into what some like to call "venting" and literally not one thing was accomplished - except that I felt like I had made a HUGE mistake in choosing to be an instructional coach.

Flash forward to a couple of years later. Teachers arrived with their materials for planning. Everyone knew what the upcoming unit was, and where to find the resources the district had provided. We reviewed the state test questions and decided what question stems we'd include in our daily lessons. 
One teacher shared her thinking about the nonfiction unit and led the conversation about the ideas she had put together for our PLC. Other teachers reminded her, "Remember this idea from last year? I really think that worked." I facilitated the meeting, moving us from one focus to the next and interjecting when needed, providing a different perspective on the standard and its intricacies. In short, we were collaborating.

Was it perfect? Nope. Was it purposeful? Yes! How did this happen? Well, it definitely didn't happen overnight, or even from one nine weeks to the next. It took time, it took patience, and it took structure. Here are some of the structures I recommend to have in place when you plan collaboratively with teachers.

Before the planning session

One type of professional learning community is a planning PLC. During a planning PLC, teachers plan collaboratively for an upcoming lesson, unit, or time frame. This post includes steps for instructional coaches to take to facilitate planning before, during, and after the planning session! Learn tips and ideas about why agendas matter, how to get started right away with preplanning, and why you start with the standards. Stop spinning your wheels during planning time and get something accomplished!  
1. Everyone needs to know what is going on. Teachers need to have access to the curriculum provided by the district or state, whether that's an online source, a textbook, or any other type of curriculum. They need to know what's coming up by looking at the curriculum calendar. Everyone also needs to know what the purpose of the session is. Are you planning for every content area for one week? For reading only, for two weeks? For an entire unit? Make sure this goal is clear to everyone involved by providing an agenda.

2. Have teachers prepare for the planning session. One way to do this is to have grade levels designate one person per team to be responsible for "preplanning" each content area. For example, in a grade level with five teachers, it might look like this:

Reading - Gonzalez
Writing - Beltran
Math - Medina
Science - Bejarano
Social Studies- Rangel

For each content area that they are "preplanning", the teacher would dig into the curriculum documents, think about possible learning targets for each step along the way, identify a few possible ideas for students to interact with the content, bring a few materials that might work well, and review the tested language: vocabulary and question stems that students would be expected to know and use.

Ideally, the teacher would lead the PLC planning. For my school, some grade levels made it to this point, and some still relied on me to facilitate the planning. As long as teachers have a voice and are ready to contribute, either way works. Grade levels just develop differently.

3. The facilitator (the instructional coach, in this case) needs to be very prepared to facilitate the planning session. This includes...
  • Understanding how students learn incrementally towards the standard they are expected to master
  • Knowing the curriculum inside and out
  • Being very familiar with the end of unit expectations or the end of year test and what this content looks like on that assessment
  • Having ideas for books, resources, and activities that could work
  • Reflecting on grade level dynamics and how to best support the grade in collaborating: giving teachers thinking and responding time, asking everyone to contribute as needed, clarifying understandings of the concepts that are being taught, addressing misconceptions, etc.
  • Creating an atmosphere of collaboration and ensuring that people feel like they can get the support they need 
  • Keeping in mind any upcoming dates, school expectations, etc. that need to be built into the plans. This could be holidays, district testing dates, book of the month or other school initiatives, and due dates for important artifacts.
I recommend to organize your curriculum documents, calendars, and other 
relevant planning materials by grade level.
 Get organized with the Instructional Coaching MegaPack.


4. Agree on a lesson planning document that everyone is comfortable with. This should include the parts needed: whatever components you are planning for (minilesson, read alouds, independent practice, etc.), the learning target for each lesson, and the procedure for completing the lesson. Simple is better.

During the planning session
1. Be aware that this can be a challenging role. When it comes to planning together, there are definitely pros and cons. Pros: teachers can learn and figure things out together. Everyone benefits from everyone else's knowledge and experience. Cons: teachers might feel like they have to agree with things even if they really don't. Everyone has different teaching styles. 

There's really no right answer to this challenge. But research does show that planning together improves student achievement, so we know that the pros outweigh the cons in the long run.
  
2. Designate roles for planning together. Someone should write down the thoughts of the meeting. I preferred to scribe myself, because it was easier for me to do this while facilitating than it was to leave it to another teacher. However, most teachers also prefer to record their own notes so they have their own thinking documented. Someone else may serve as a timekeeper, or the person who asks clarification questions.


3. Start with the standards. Discuss what they entail and what kinds of thinking students need to do in order to master them. Consider the unit assessment or state assessment. Use this to create learning targets: step-by-step learning objectives to help students do the requisite learning and move into mastering the standard. Then chunk these over the days you think it will take for teachers and students to work through them.



4.  Plan what will to do, what materials to use, and what to say on a day-to-day basis. Be specific and clarify. Ask questions that help teachers envision themselves teaching and make sure that everyone understands. This might include...
  • What does that look like?
  • When __ happens, what do you say? what do you do?
  • How do students complete this assignment?
  • Can you show us a sample problem? (Asking a teacher to model on the spot can be scary, but it's so valuable for each teacher to see it in action!)
  • How do you introduce that idea?
  • How would you say that in kid-friendly language? 
  • How will we know if the student is being successful? What will that look like? 
  • How will we assess this standard? How will it be scored or evaluated? When will that happen?
**If you're planning to model or coteach, read more about how to prepare for this in next week's post!

5. Get participation from different voices. If you notice one teacher leading the conversation with little participation from others (or if you catch yourself doing this - I am a verbal processor, so I have to catch myself frequently), pause to get some responses from others. You could say...
  • You have so many ideas, Mr. So and So! Thank you for sharing. What do you think, So and So?
  • Does anyone have a response to that?
  • Do you agree/disagree?
  • Ms. So and So, I'm noticing you seem to be concerned/quiet/reserving your comments/keeping your thoughts to yourself/nodding. Can you tell us a little bit about what you're thinking?
  • Would you share your thinking about this, So and So?
  • Ms. So and So, I've seen you do something like that in your classroom really well. Can you share that with us?
  • Has anyone tried this?
  • Does anyone see any possible problems with this approach?
After the planning session
1. Make sure everyone has what they need to do their job. This might mean requesting books from the library, or sharing an activity digitally or on paper. It's also important to share the final lesson plan with everyone - give everybody a digital or paper copy of the ideas they put together.
2.  Follow up. Check in and see how the plans are going. Ask teachers about what adjustments could be made to your planning process.

Did you check out my post from last week? It's all about conducting a coaching cycle! And check back next week for my next post in the series: Preparing to Model and Coteach!

Other posts in the Summer Coaching Series: 

One lucky duck will win the Instructional Coaching Kit, an over $170 value!


Included in this kit (some of these are affiliate links: 


And four people will win the Digital Coaching Giveaway: the Instructional Coaching Resource Bundle and my all-new Coaching in Classrooms resource! Over $75.00 worth of products!

To enter this contest, follow the rafflecopter directions below to enter. Plus, you can add one new entry with each blog post that comes out in the Summer Coaching Series!

If you're really serious about winning, you can share a takeaway (bonus points) every single day between now and August 17, when the giveaway closes.




 
 
Coaching teachers doesn't have to feel like deep sea diving with no oxygen tank. Get my free download, Coaching in Classrooms:  A Free Download to help you get started.

  • Tips for getting started
  • Coaching services menu
  • Classroom sweep form
  • Coaching invitations (black and white)
  • Using the gradual release model to coach teachers
  • Coaching plan
  • Observation guide
  • Debriefing sentence starters
  • Thank you notes
You can get them all by entering your email address below!

 
Pin It

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Conducting a Coaching Cycle: The Instructional Coaching Series

Conducting an instructional coaching cycle can be scary and stressful, but these five steps will help you get started with coaching in classrooms! Learn about how instructional coaches can support teachers through choosing and inviting a teacher to work with you, planning together, coteaching, debriefing, and more, all bundled into one friendly coaching cycle. These strategies and ideas will provide you with an easy approach to coaching! Are you afraid to work with teachers? Many coaches are. Working with teachers is scary. This is why: 
  • You don't know if they like you.
  • You think they don't want your help.
  • You don't know if you're good enough to model or coteach.
  • You don't always have all of the answers.
  • You feel like a fraud.
Ring any bells? Those are my deepest, darkest fears. Here's what I say to myself to get over it:

I am not here to be the best or to have all of the answers. I am here to support teachers so that they can provide the best possible instruction to kids. No one person has to be perfect; we're a community of people learning together. We can't learn together if I don't put myself out there. 

Still scared? How about this:
It's your job.

Haha! I know. That maybe didn't help too much. But the point is that the only way teachers are going to grow is if you can swallow your pride (and fear) and get into those classrooms.

Here are a few tips for setting up a coaching cycle with a teacher. You can get more tips in the free download at the bottom of this post!

#1: For your first round of coaching, choose carefully.
Start with the teacher who has some stuff going on but who'd like to try something new. That means DO NOT start with the teacher who doesn't like you (gasp!) or the teacher who has every single amazing thing going on. Start with a good, solid teacher who'd like to learn a new thing or two. It helps if they have a positive influence over their grade level, too!


Conducting an instructional coaching cycle can be scary and stressful, but these five steps will help you get started with coaching in classrooms! Learn about how instructional coaches can support teachers through choosing and inviting a teacher to work with you, planning together, coteaching, debriefing, and more, all bundled into one friendly coaching cycle. These strategies and ideas will provide you with an easy approach to coaching!
#2 Invite the teacher to work with you.

There are lots of fun ways to do this such as physical or email invitations, or you could go the tried and true route and just ask them.

Either way, make sure that they know a coaching cycle is...
  • flexible based on the needs and goals of the teacher
  • focused on learning students should be doing anyway
  • usually around 2-4 weeks long
  • scheduled at a time that works for teacher and coach
  • about learning and growing together
  • fun and purposeful
Get 8 beautiful coaching invitations in my new Coaching in Classrooms resource!
Or get a free black and white version as part of my free download right below this post!

#3 Plan together. Plan together. Plan together. 
I can't say that enough times. Plan together for EVERYTHING. I'll have a detailed post about collaborative planning coming out later in this series, but for now, just know that you need to plan for a few things together:
Conducting an instructional coaching cycle can be scary and stressful, but these five steps will help you get started with coaching in classrooms! Learn about how instructional coaches can support teachers through choosing and inviting a teacher to work with you, planning together, coteaching, debriefing, and more, all bundled into one friendly coaching cycle. These strategies and ideas will provide you with an easy approach to coaching!
  • What kind of service you will provide. Will you model? Will you coteach? Will you observe and provide feedback? 
  • The learning target for the lesson: what do students need to know and do in this lesson?
  • The lesson. This doesn't have to be really complicated. A simple plan that includes the target, steps in the procedure, and which materials you'll  use should be fine. Embed the vocabulary and the questions in the procedure rather then separating them out. They tend to be forgotten that way.
  • The classroom management plan. Here's a possible system you can try out if there's not one in place.
  • What each person will do. I recommend using a three-columned planner to show what is happening during the lesson and what each person's responsibilities are during that time. This is especially important during coteaching.
  • This editable and printable planner is part of my Coaching in Classrooms resource on TpT!

Need ideas for setting up coteaching roles? Here are a few easy ways to share responsibility!

Conducting an instructional coaching cycle can be scary and stressful, but these five steps will help you get started with coaching in classrooms! Learn about how instructional coaches can support teachers through choosing and inviting a teacher to work with you, planning together, coteaching, debriefing, and more, all bundled into one friendly coaching cycle. These strategies and ideas will provide you with an easy approach to coaching!
  
#4 Build in time to debrief.
Meet with the teacher after a lesson to reflect on a few things. Have a plan for debriefing.
  • The effectiveness of the plan on student learning
  • What the next steps should be
  • What kind of support should be provided

#5 Work through the cycle together.
If you need to make changes, do it! Don't stick to modeling for the duration of the cycle, and don't stick to 50/50 coteaching, either. Change the type and level of support to respond to the needs of the teacher and students.

Conducting an instructional coaching cycle can be scary and stressful, but these five steps will help you get started with coaching in classrooms! Learn about how instructional coaches can support teachers through choosing and inviting a teacher to work with you, planning together, coteaching, debriefing, and more, all bundled into one friendly coaching cycle. These strategies and ideas will provide you with an easy approach to coaching!

Get the Coaching Cycle Checklist in The Instructional Coach's Book of Plans & Lists!

Next week, I'm going to share all about how to plan collaboratively. Be sure to check back and read that post, because it's a BIG one!

Other posts in the Summer Coaching Series: 
One lucky duck will win the Instructional Coaching Kit, an over $170 value!


Included in this kit (some of these are affiliate links: 


And four people will win the Digital Coaching Giveaway: the Instructional Coaching Resource Bundle and my all-new Coaching in Classrooms resource! Over $75.00 worth of products!

To enter this contest, follow the rafflecopter directions below to enter. Plus, you can add one new entry with each blog post that comes out in the Summer Coaching Series!

If you're really serious about winning, you can share a takeaway (bonus points) every single day between now and August 17, when the giveaway closes.




 
 
Get the coaching menu, a coaching invitation and thank you note, and tips & forms to help you start working with teachers by filling in your email address below!

  • Tips for getting started
  • Coaching services menu
  • Classroom sweep form
  • Coaching invitations (black and white)
  • Using the gradual release model to coach teachers
  • Coaching plan
  • Observation guide
  • Debriefing sentence starters
  • Thank you notes
You can get them all by entering your email address below!

 
Pin It

Saturday, July 13, 2019

How to introduce yourself as an instructional coach: The instructional coaching series

Need ideas for introducing yourself as an instructional coach? Without a good introduction, teachers might not know what job you are there to do. This post shares three fun ways for introducing yourself and your role as a coach. Try a newsletter or a presentation, or even a fun "Coffee with the Coach" event to share your role and responsibilities with teachers! When I first started coaching, I just...started. I was introduced during a faculty meeting, I gave a professional development day on shared reading, and I set up my room. When I met teachers, I said, "Hi! I'm excited to be here! Thanks!"

They had no idea what I was supposed to be doing.
Previously, they hadn't really had an "instructional coach". They had someone who filled my position, but this person was used as more of an administrative type person, so the teachers didn't have experience with coaching.

My principal asked me to start visiting classrooms so I could get to know the school and faculty, so I did.
Teachers asked what they were doing wrong.
I started planning with grade levels during PLC.
Teachers wanted me to make their copies.
I looked over data to figure out which students needed intervention.
Teachers said I should pull small groups and do it myself.

Basically, without a good introduction to my role as an instructional coach, there was a lot of misunderstanding as to why I was even on that campus. 

And it made doing my job very difficult.

If I could go back and have a redo (don't we all want at least a couple of redos?), this is what I'd do instead: I'd explicitly introduce myself and my role to the faculty as a whole. Then I'd reiterate it in grade levels. Then, when I was approaching individuals for coaching work, I'd share it again.

Here are three different ideas for introducing yourself and your role as an instructional coach! The best part? These ideas will work even if you've already been working with a school. You can re-introduce yourself and your role to start the year heading in a different direction!

Choose a method that suits your personality and your approach. You want people to know who you are and what you're about right away!

ONE BIG IMPORTANT TIP: Make sure you and your principal are on the same page when it comes to your coaching roles and responsibilities. It's important to have a conversation before you introduce your role to your teachers. Need a checklist to be prepared for this conversation? Check out the Roles and Responsibilities checklist from The Coach's Book of Plans and Lists.

Need ideas for introducing yourself as an instructional coach? Without a good introduction, teachers might not know what job you are there to do. This post shares three fun ways for introducing yourself and your role as a coach. Try a newsletter or a presentation, or even a fun "Coffee with the Coach" event to share your role and responsibilities with teachers!
#1 Coaching Roles Presentation
For this idea, you'll need to "borrow" a few minutes during a faculty meeting to share about your role as a coach. 

Prepare a PowerPoint or a Keynote presentation that includes an introduction to you as a person, as well as your instructional background. 
Include the kinds of support you can provide to teachers, such as what a coaching cycle can look like and what you can do to help them work towards their goals. 
Explicitly introduce which content areas, grade levels, or subjects you're going to work with, if you are limited in any way.
Need a ready-to-go (but editable) presentation? Get it in my Coaching in Classrooms resource. 

#2 Coffee with the Coach
If you're unable to secure time with the faculty, you can host a little before or after school event (or you can park yourself in one spot and make yourself available all day for people to come by). I recommend hosting this event in your own room, if you have space, so people can start to become comfortable with visiting your space in a nonthreatening way.

Need ideas for introducing yourself as an instructional coach? Without a good introduction, teachers might not know what job you are there to do. This post shares three fun ways for introducing yourself and your role as a coach. Try a newsletter or a presentation, or even a fun "Coffee with the Coach" event to share your role and responsibilities with teachers! Send out little invitations that include the day, time, and location of "Coffee with the Coach". 
Prepare a nice coffee bar, and make sure that this bonus is noted on your invitation. (In other words, a doughnut or breakfast burrito never hurt anybody.) You want people to show up on their own accord, so you have to provide that nice incentive.
As people arrive, make sure you have written out how you plan to introduce yourself. 
It helps to have your services available in writing, too, such as on a Coaching Menu that you can hand out to people as they arrive. 
You can get a Coaching Menu as part of my Coaching in Classrooms resource, or you can join my email list at the end of this post to get one for free in your inbox.

 
#3 Coaching Newsletter
Again, if you aren't able to get time with your entire faculty, sending out an introductory newsletter will at least get the ball rolling. 
In your newsletter, include a bit about who you are (with points that will help people relate to you such as interest, hobbies, or family life) and your instructional background. Make sure to explain simply the services you plan to provide and the grades/content areas you are able to work with. Make it easy to contact you via a phone number or an email address.
You're unlikely to get many responses to it, but you want to make it immediately clear that you're there to support teachers towards their goals. It's important to be available and reachable!
Need ideas for introducing yourself as an instructional coach? Without a good introduction, teachers might not know what job you are there to do. This post shares three fun ways for introducing yourself and your role as a coach. Try a newsletter or a presentation, or even a fun "Coffee with the Coach" event to share your role and responsibilities with teachers!
No matter what method you choose, make sure you do these things:
  • Introduce yourself as a human. (begin making connections to people)
  • Introduce yourself as an educator (this builds credibility)
  • Describe the services you can and will provide 
  • Explain how to contact you for these services
  • Assure teachers that you are there to work towards their goals of educating their students
The posts for the blog series this summer are: 
One lucky duck will win the Instructional Coaching Kit, an over $170 value!


Included in this kit (some of these are affiliate links: 


And four people will win the Digital Coaching Giveaway: the Instructional Coaching Resource Bundle and my all-new Coaching in Classrooms resource! Over $75.00 worth of products!

To enter this contest, follow the rafflecopter directions below to enter. Plus, you can add one new entry with each blog post that comes out in the Summer Coaching Series!

If you're really serious about winning, you can share a takeaway (bonus points) every single day between now and August 17, when the giveaway closes.




 
 
I've put together a collection of free tools for instructional coaches:
  • Tips for getting started
  • Coaching services menu
  • Classroom sweep form
  • Coaching invitations (black and white)
  • Using the gradual release model to coach teachers
  • Coaching plan
  • Observation guide
  • Debriefing sentence starters
  • Thank you notes
You can get them all by entering your email address below!
 
 
Pin It

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Instructional Coaching Summer Series & Giveaway

It's time for my favorite annual event at Buzzing with Ms. B. The Summer Coaching Series & Giveaway!

Here's the why: 
When coaches are hired, they are often teachers who have demonstrated a lot of strength in the classroom. But when they're moved to a coaching position, they're often left to figure out how to work with adults on their own.

If you've been coaching for any length of time at all, it's clear: kids and teachers are two very different animals. The way we worked with kids isn't always the way to work with teachers.

The challenge is that there isn't always a lot of support or professional development for coaches.

That's why this Summer Coaching Series is all about how to support teachers in order to support students.

You'll walk away with specific ideas and steps to take to make your coaching work better and help you coach with confidence!

And here's the what:

The posts for the blog series this summer are: 
One lucky duck will win the Instructional Coaching Kit, an over $170 value!


Included in this kit (some of these are affiliate links: 


And four people will win the Digital Coaching Giveaway: the Instructional Coaching Resource Bundle and my all-new Coaching in Classrooms resource! Over $75.00 worth of products!

To enter this contest, follow the rafflecopter directions below to enter. Plus, you can add one new entry with each blog post that comes out in the Summer Coaching Series!

If you're really serious about winning, you can share a takeaway (bonus points) every single day between now and August 17, when the giveaway closes.




 
 

Pin It

Saturday, July 6, 2019

Six Tips for Coaching Reader's Workshop

Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
As instructional coaches, we coach a variety of contents and strategies. We help teachers grow in whatever area they are focused on and using the approach that works best for students.

However, in many schools, there are a collection of approaches that the school is working towards. In this case, the coach is called on to coach teachers within those frameworks. This is the case if your school uses a framework such as Reader's Workshop, Writer's Workshop, or Math Workshop.

Each of these frameworks  will look different from classroom to classroom, but the basic components will be the same. In Reader's Workshop, those components are the minilesson, independent reading, guided reading, reading conferences, and a closing share.

Here are six tips to help you get started in coaching Reader's Workshop!



#1 Start out by building a common language.  
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!Without a common language, planning together and communicating can be really challenging. For example, the word "read" is used to mean many things. Some teachers use it to mean students are decoding accurately, but not comprehending. Others use it to mean that students read and comprehend - real reading.
 
If everyone has a different idea what you're saying when you say, "minilesson", "inference", and "word study", it is nearly impossible to plan together effectively. Spending time on building a common language is a valuable way to grow a team.
 
Ways to do this may include modeling lessons for each component, creating a video bank of modeled lessons so teachers can watch them when they have time, doing language-building activities during PD where teachers match Reader's Workshop vocabulary words with their definitions before and after the session, and doing a book study on this framework.

#2 Collect everyone’s schedule.  
This is not a “gotcha”. This is to help you in scheduling visits to classrooms, opportunities for teachers to learn from each other, and to see where teachers are planning to spend their time during Reader’s Workshop. If something isn’t included in a teacher’s plan for the day, it’s definitely not on their radar. This will tell you what teachers value in reading instruction.

Once you have everyone's schedule, organize it into a spreadsheet. I broke mine down into fifteen minute increments. Then I made a column for each grade level and wrote in what they were doing during each time frame. It made it much easier for me to figure out when a good time to visit might be, and when to plan time to collaborate with teachers!
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
#3 Make sure teachers have what they need. 
Do a sweep of the school to ensure that teachers have classroom libraries, a space for guided reading, and the instructional tools and materials they need. This could be easels, chart paper, binders, baskets to organize books, book bins or bags, etc. It’s not that tools will do the job of implementing Reader’s Workshop, but if you can make a teacher’s life easier and better, and improve the student's learning experience by getting them what they need, why not? 

Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
 
You may not be able to get everybody everything they'd like, but you may have some input when the principal is making purchases for the campus.
 
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
 
#4 Make sure that training includes a focus on the standards. 
Teachers need to know their standards, and so do you. Make sure that that you are really well versed in the standards for each grade and what they look like. Planning should start with what students need to learn how to do. If it doesn’t, it’s just fluff.
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
 
#5 Create a culture of collaboration. 
 One non-threatening way to start this is to ask people to bring something they’d like to share for your next PLC. Each person brings one student or classroom artifact that they have created throughout their unit of study. 
At the beginning of your next PLC meeting, ask each person to share their artifact and explain their process a little so everyone can learn from each other. 
Perhaps teachers can bring a reader's notebook response or entry. They can take a picture of an anchor chart they built with their students during a lesson, or share a mentor text that works really well with a particular skill.
Over time, this can grow, but it starts with making collaboration a standard “way of being”.

#6 Create a mentor text library.  
Organize books by reading strategy or skill. Label them. Host them in your coaching room. Over time, you can make sure teachers have a great collection of books, too. Read about how we put together grade level mentor text baskets for our teachers!
 
 
Coaching reader's workshop doesn't have to be impossible with these six ideas for getting started. Learn about how to help elementary teachers understand words like minilesson and independent reading, one easy way to gt teachers to collaborate and share, and one tip that will make scheduling a breeze. Get started right away with these easy strategies!
 

Want to hear about these tips in detail? Check out my video on YouTube all about these six tips for coaching Reader's Workshop!
 
 
Pin It
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...